A Sustainable Workforce Starts With You

Marek states that if the estimated 2.5 million undocumented immigrants in Texas were protected from deportation, they would have to start paying taxes like all other Texas residents while continuing to boost the Texas economy by billions of dollars.
Stan Marek's picture
April 28, 2016
The scope of work on the books for the next 10 years for the Texas Gulf Coast is unprecedented. If manpower cannot be secured at competitive rates, it is quite likely these plants won't be built or the projects will be moved elsewhere.
Stan Marek's picture
October 29, 2015
I love the construction industry and I speak from experience when telling you it has to be saved from itself. Since 1938, our family business has helped build the monuments of this city and this state. More importantly, our companies – like many others over the past 75 years – have helped tens of thousands of hard-working Americans enjoy an honorable blue collar, middle class standard of living. But, now our middle class is threatened like never before.
Stan Marek's picture
February 04, 2015
Now that the election is over, political news has quickly become dominated by the impending immigration showdown between President Barack Obama and the Republicans on Capitol Hill.  In my opinion as an employer, the president's intent to use an executive order to extend legal status to millions of undocumented people in our country is simply misunderstood.  To the tea party, it is amnesty.  To the faith community, it represents compassion.  As a practical matter, it's just a reflection of reality.
Stan Marek's picture
December 02, 2014
I have been in the construction industry my whole life.  As was my great grandfather who built the castles in Olomouc, Czech Republic but left to find the freedom offered by emigrating to America.  My Father and his brothers started our company 75 years ago with the sons of immigrant farmers from Central Texas towns like Yoakum, Hallettsville, and Shiner.  After many years of success in building a quality labor force of young men off the farm, the equation changed.  Latino workers came by the millions to fill the jobs that our growing nation provided.  President Reagan's immigration reform in 1986 offered amnesty for those already in the country but failed to create a legal way to migrate for the millions who would come after them.Estimates are that over 30 million men and women immigrated to the U.S. in the two decades from 1986 to 2006.  Some left after a few years, but most stayed, put down roots, and tried to assimilate into their communities.  
Stan Marek's picture
December 03, 2013
As a longtime supporter of comprehensive immigration reform, I am more optimistic than ever about a real solution coming out of Washington.  The partisanship and ideology surrounding the issue are melting away, replaced by pragmatism and a realization that we cannot continue the status quo.As a conservative Republican businessman, I've been disappointed over the years to see many in my own party become completely intractable on the issue.  But, there are real leaders emerging who want to set aside the divisions of the past, roll up their sleeves, and craft reform that improves our economy and corrects years of social injustice.  GOP Texas Congressmen Ted Poe, Sam Johnson, John Carter and Pete Olson all now support comprehensive reform that includes a robust guest worker program.  
Stan Marek's picture
October 02, 2013
The labor situation in Houston is heading into the biggest crisis we have ever seen.  For decades, our industry has relied on an immigrant labor force that, prior to 9/11, could cross our borders with very little problem.  That all changed after that tragic day and now crossing the border can be extremely expensive as well as dangerous.After the subprime mess and the fall out, many in the construction industry found that the jobs they once took for granted were gone.  Many returned to their native countries while others changed jobs, usually accepting less pay and fewer opportunities.  Contractors were pressured to lay off employees and hire “contract labor” to try to compete for a much smaller volume of work.With the failure of government agencies to uniformly enforce wage and hour laws, many “contract” workers paid no payroll taxes, overtime, or costs of workers’ compensation insurance.  This gave them a tremendous cost advantage that ultimately led to lower wages throughout the industry.
Stan Marek's picture
October 09, 2012
The following was originally published in the September issues of Construction News, a monthly industry periodical in the four major metropolitan areas of Texas. It was written by Stan Marek, CEO of the Marek Family of Companies in Houston.  As stated in Construction News, “Like a number of others, his company struggles to find work despite a strong Texas economy.  He believes that a broken immigration system that is fueling unscrupulous business practices in the construction industry is at least one of the culprits.”Texas has always carried the distinction of being one of the best places to do business in the entire USA.  That’s great for those of us here but even better for those commercial contractors who want to come here.  The fact that we have, within our borders, several hundred thousand undocumented workers bodes well for many contractors who want to come into the state and have an instant, but not necessarily legal, labor force.
Stan Marek's picture
September 06, 2012